THE SHORTEST WAY TO SUCCESS!
   
 
HOME ABOUT US FORUM SITE MAP CONTACT US
 
 
Date: 26.Jun.2019 - Wed
Time: 1:23 AM

Scores*

How the General Test Is Scored

The processes for calculating reported scores for adaptive tests and traditional paper-and-pencil tests are similar, in that the number of questions answered correctly is adjusted according to the difficulty level of the questions on the test form. Thus, the same number of correct responses on different test forms will not necessarily result in the same reported score.

In paper-and-pencil tests, the differences in difficulty among test forms are relatively small and are adjusted through a process known as score equating. The number of questions answered is also figured into the calculation of the reported score because it limits the number that can be answered correctly.

With adaptive testing, an examinee is administered a set of questions with a difficulty level that is specifically designed to match the examinee's ability level. The mathematical process for calculating a score in this situation incorporates the statistical properties of the questions, the examinee's performance on the questions, and the number of questions that are answered.

How the Sections of the General Test Are Scored

Analytical Writing Section

◊ The primary emphasis in scoring the analytical writing section is on the test taker's critical thinking and analytical writing skills rather than on grammar and mechanics.
◊ A single score is reported for the test taker's performance on the analytical writing section.
◊ The essay score usually is the average of scores from two trained readers, using a 6-point holistic scale. The scale reflects the overall quality of an essay in response to the assigned task.
◊ If the two assigned scores differ by more than one point on the scale, the discrepancy is adjudicated by a third GRE reader. Otherwise, the scores from the two readings of an essay are averaged and rounded up to the nearest half-point interval (e.g., 3.0, 3.5).
◊ An NS (No Score) is reported if the test taker does not write a response for either of the two tasks in the analytical writing section. If the test taker writes an essay for only one of the two tasks, he/she receives a score of zero on the task for which no response was provided.
◊ During the scoring process, the test taker's essay responses on the analytical writing section will be reviewed by ETS essay-similarity-detection software and by experienced essay readers.

Verbal and Quantitative Sections

Paper-Based Test: Scoring of the verbal and quantitative sections of the paper-based General Test is a two-step process.

◊ First, a raw score is computed. The raw score is the number of questions you answered correctly.
◊ The raw score is then converted to a scaled score through a process known as equating. Equating accounts for differences in difficulty among the different test editions. Thus, a given scaled score reflects approximately the same level of ability regardless of the edition of the test that was taken.

GREŽ General Test Score Scales

Three scores are reported on the General Test:

◊ a verbal reasoning score reported on a 200-800 score scale, in 10-point increments
◊ a quantitative reasoning score reported on a 200-800 score scale, in 10-point increments
an analytical writing score reported on a 0 to 6 score scale in half-point increments.
◊ Any section in which the test taker answers no questions at all will be reported as a No Score (NS).


How the Subject Tests are Scored

In calculating reported scores for traditional paper-and-pencil tests, the number of questions answered correctly is adjusted according to the difficulty level of the questions on the test form. Thus, the same number of correct responses on different test forms will not necessarily result in the same reported score.

In paper-and-pencil tests, the differences in difficulty among test forms are relatively small and are adjusted through a process known as score equating. The number of questions answered is also figured into the calculation of the reported score because it limits the number that can be answered correctly.

How the Subject Tests Are Scored

Scoring of the Subject Tests is a two-step process.

◊ First, a raw score is computed. The raw score is the number of correct answers minus one-fourth the number of incorrect answers.
◊ The raw score is then converted to a scaled score through a process known as equating that accounts for differences in difficulty among the different test editions. Thus, a given scaled score reflects approximately the same level of ability regardless of the edition of the test that was taken.
Subject Test Score Scales
◊ One total score is reported on a 200-990 score scale, in 10-point increments.
◊ Subscores are reported for the Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology; Biology; and Psychology Tests on a 20-99 score scale, in 1-point increments.

 

*www.ets.org

User:   Pass:
All Content © 2001-2018 Diem-M. Privacy Policy
All Rights Reserved. Diem-M® is registered by BG National & International laws.